Why I Blog Without a Photo

As a woman in a male-dominated field, I am sometimes noticed for my looks before my brains, probably far, far more often than I notice.

When I started this blog, I contemplated using a male pseudonym instead of a female one, but I’m glad that I did choose a female one.

I am a young, professional woman. I am obsessed with saving money and always have been. In writing this blog without a photo, you, the readers, are seeing me without being able to gauge my physical appearance. You can judge my view on finances objectively.

Why does it matter if I’m attractive or not? Hiding behind the internet, you can’t tell if I’m a 300 pound woman or if I’m petite. You can’t tell exactly how old I am (not that anyone guesses correctly in person anyway), though I do make it clear that I’m in my twenties and a few years out of college. You don’t know what my hair color is, nor my eye color, or how tall or short I am. You don’t know how big my feet or my chest are, or what my ring size is. (Not that I even know what my ring size is.)

What do you see? You see (some of) my spending plans. You see how much I save, how much I invest, and (almost) how much time I spend thinking about and analyzing my finances. You see my income, vaguely. You see my travel spending. But no photo. It shouldn’t matter to you what I look like. That is completely irrelevant to how I manage my finances.

Telling you if I was pregnant or if I had a significant other or if I was planning a wedding, now that would be relevant to how I manage my finances. But I’m not. I’m single and I’m just me, no kids.

It’s pretty nice for once to not worry if people are judging me for how I look. In this blog, I forget about any of those anxieties and just concentrate on the financial anxiety outlook that this is :)

Readers who also blog anonymously, what’s your favorite part? Do you enjoy people not knowing what you look like?

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17 thoughts on “Why I Blog Without a Photo

      • When I first entered the wild world of the internet I had a pseudonym that was gender neutral. (Not on purpose or anything.) I was surprised to find out that everyone thought I was a wise middle-aged white guy. I was treated differently when they found out I was a young woman instead.

  1. Hmm , I just don’t want a coworker/random to be able to google my name and come up with my blog. While I don’t like plastering photos of myself all over my blog, there has been one or two. My appearance isn’t important to my blog, and I do like that.

    I also read a lot of running/healthy living blogs, and every post has photos of the author (it seems). It is a different sort of world!

    • That makes sense too and that’s why I chose to use a pseudonym. I wouldn’t feel like I could be open about my finances using my real name. I still don’t think I will post any photos of myself, but then again, I hate photos of myself :)

  2. When I first started the blog, I debated being anonymous. If I had gone that route, it would have been easier to be more open with all my financial information. :) It is interesting to wonder how I would be perceived if I didn’t have pictures of myself though.

    Interesting post! We are judged by our appearance every day and it must be somewhat of a relief to not have that pressure on your blog. Have a good weekend!

  3. I blogged anonymously for over 10 years. I understand all the reasons behind it, but one day I woke up and thought…I just want to be me. I want people to know me. So I took a break from blogging and started over completely. It’s definitely different, but it’s also keeping me more accountable than blogging anonymously did. I have one image of me on my site, but I figure if people are going to judge me, it’ll be more on the septum ring than my actual looks lol. I’m the only female in the company I work for and all our clients are guys, so I also deal with the looks before brains bs on a daily basis. The sexism I deal with from clients is the worst, they can be so condescending and will even say “put a man on the phone, honey”! My boss is awesome, so I know finding my site wouldn’t be an issue. I really don’t have to keep much “private” to protect a job or anything. I do protect the identities of my family and husband though. I love reading blogs, especially women PF bloggers, but I also love seeing a face to go with it.

    • I have a professional blog that I occasionally (very occasionally, oops) write on. That one has a photo and is most definitely not anonymous.

      Sounds like you work with far worse guys than I do. Most of the guys I work with don’t comment on my looks, even if (hah – though) they notice them. I’ve definitely had bad coworkers, but at this point, the respectful ones far outcount the disrespectful ones.

      I mostly prefer reading PF blogs written by women as well, so that’s why I in the end ended up choosing a female pseudonym :)

  4. Former Anonymous as well. And then one day I said Screw it. I am who I am like it or not. And I love it. It might very well be different but generally I find people do tend to connect on an even deeper level when the Anonymity is gone. Not always, but many times.

  5. For me, it’s less about the face and more about the name.

    I have a few pictures of me scattered across various posts, but my profile on my About page remains staunchly vague.

    • That’s probably true for me as well. But hiding behind another name and anonymizing some of the things I do (e.g. the names of the sports that I play) makes me feel more comfortable in telling my story.

  6. I know what you mean about being judged by looks because we’re in a male dominated field. I planned to be completely anonymous when I started my blog but finally posted my real first name – I have trouble giving myself a pseudonym for some reason. I just posted a pic of myself but only from the neck down so I can still retain some sort of anonymity. :)

  7. I think people connect better with me because they know what I look like. In terms of looks, I doubt my dishevelled homeless guy motif wins me points.

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